Window trim or “Be careful what you start…”

OK, as I mentioned in an earlier blog post, the wonderful new lighting in the bathroom has highlighted just what a state the paint on the original window is in. There are a litany of challenges, both simple and complex, to address including:

  • The many, many layers of paint that have been deposited, chipped, and redeposited over the years.
  • The need to integrate the strip of new pine that was inserted between the casing and the trim to adjust for the new depth of the wall.
  • The need to address the flat, unadorned trim itself – it’s not that it needs to be fancy but should at least mirror the trim that is around the door.
  • Repair the multitude of dings, gouges, and chipped edges of the window stool (the flat portion of the frame at the bottom inside of the window).
  • Free up the painted on stop on the left hand side so that I can eventually take the window apart and restore it from its current painted over single hung action to the double hung function it originally had.
  • Other things that I’m sure I’m forgetting.

Unfortunately, I thought of almost none of these ahead of time.

As the trim had come off during the demo, I at least had the foresight to strip them of their paint and re-prime them before installation. This included an epoxy repair to correct some damage to the top right corner from the removal itself. The result is what you see in the picture above – the dark patches are the filler that the contractor used when re-installing the trim. I figured an easy upgrade was to add on some L-trim on the two exposed edges so that the window would match the door.

All good here though I had to cope the shape of the chair rail into the left hand molding since, as I mentioned, I didn’t plan ahead to have this done before the tiling happened. Still the results look good – just need to fill the nail holes and all done, right? Not so fast…

It is at this point that I should warn you to be careful what you start. As I was getting ready to paint the trim, I realized that the casing where the new pine strip was inserted would not look particularly nice if I just tried to slather yet another coat of paint over it and re-install the blinds.

Alright then – guess I’m stripping the side casing so I can clean up the transition between the old and the new and end up with a lovely smooth single casing.

Hmmm, guess that top casing will need to be done too. Oh, and the stool at the bottom, that has clearly taken a beating over the years and needs a bit of love before getting a new coat of paint. And the sash stops, can’t leave them out of the party…

Cut to 11:45 PM and me still trying to finish that “little bit of stripping” that I started. Finally had to call it a night. This is how it sits at the moment (if you’re wondering why it is so light out at just before midnight, the pictures are from the morning after – was too tired to even get my camera last night).

I’m certain this will look amazing when it’s done but right now, all I can see is another 5 hours of heating, scraping, sanding, and all the other aspects of a dirty job like restoring old windows. And that is just to get the paint off! Still need to patch and fill the wood and get everything sanded down. More to come, stay tuned…

People interested in seeing the full renovation process as tracked in this blog should start here.

Window trim or “Be careful what you start…” (Part 2)

Window trim or “Be careful what you start…” (Part 3)

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